The Stories of A Cookbook

“Books are the quietest and most constant friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counsellors and the most patient of teachers.”  ~ Charles W. Eliot

A Taste of The Mediterranean by Farrow and Clark, book cover
A picture of the cover of our special cookbook.

Eating together has always been a rich part of my relationship with my husband, even while we were dating.  He has always expressed his artistic side through his cooking, and loves to experiment with recipes, adding his own twist.  He gets recipes from everywhere: old magazines, Youtube, cooking shows.  As we celebrate our 20th wedding anniversary this week, I want to tell you about the one cookbook that has most influenced the meals we’ve shared with family and friends on special occasions, as well as quiet meals at the end of a long day.

When my husband and I were on our honeymoon in Gimli, we went for a walk one afternoon, and found ourselves in a charming shop near the hotel. The small store had been there for a long time, and I believe that it is still there.  It is located in the corner of an old building, and has an eclectic collection of goods: everything from clothing to unique toys to books.  And that is where my husband first spotted this book, and I encouraged him to splurge, to go ahead and buy it.

A Taste of the Mediterranean Clark and Farrow
The book is full of gorgeous photographs of the Mediterranean.
A Taste of the Mediterranean Clark and Farrow, a page from the book
It is a well researched book with lots of interesting information about the ingredients and regions.

There was something special about this book, A Taste of The Mediterranean, by Jaqueline Clark and Joanna Farrow.  As we looked through the pages, it felt like such a labour of love.  It was a well-researched feast for the eyes. The colours, the imagery of far away places, and mismatched ceramics that were so clearly part of a real, time-worn collection, and of course, the recipes.  It simply connected our imaginations to a world of possibility.  And it still does.

I will always remember the first, official “Greek Feast” that this book inspired.  (Though we are not greek, we could have been!) Early in the spring of our first year of marriage, my husband decided to make a special dinner for my small Winnipeg family (much of my family lives elsewhere).  Several days in advance, he started to prepare: shopping, cutting, dicing, marinating.  He planned to serve lamb, with all the fixings: from Greek salad, lemon potatoes and homemade tzatziki sauce to a decadent dessert.   We decorated the kitchen in sparkling lights, and prepared to illuminate the living room and dining area with candles.

Then, on the morning of the big dinner, Winnipeg was hit by what was being called ‘The blizzard of the century’.

It was unlike anything I had seen before or since.  I mean, I’ve seen blizzards, but this was something else.  The city was paralyzed.  For the first time in more than 50 years, school divisions would have to cancel classes on the upcoming Monday.  And that night, we had to cancel our dinner.  It was disappointing, but there was no choice.  Now, we wondered, what to do with all of this food?

At the time, we lived on the 10th floor of an apartment building, and my husband’s best friend happened to live on the 9th floor (he had been the best man at our wedding).  So, our friend lucked into an impromptu invitation to our Greek Feast.  Much to our delight, our friend would later declare jovially that it was this kind of evening that makes life worth living.

It was such a surreal experience. Picture this: through the glass doors of our balcony were the awe-inspiring sights and sounds of freezing blizzard winds whipping record amounts of snow into white-out conditions. Meanwhile, inside our apartment, the atmosphere was glowing with warmth.  We were celebrating life with an exuberant home-cooked feast.  Rich culinary fragrances.  Lively greek music (and all other kinds of music, too).  Red wine.  Dessert.  Laughter. This contrast deepened the exhilaration of witnessing a winter spectacle.


That dinner marked the beginning of many memorable meals to follow.  But some were memorable for different reasons.

I remember, shortly before I got pregnant, I kept telling my husband that the next recipe he should attempt was the ‘Polpettes’, which are fried little morsels of potato with feta cheese.

Well, early in my pregnancy, I developed terrible nausea and was having trouble eating.  In an effort to help, my husband surprised me one day with a big batch of these freshly fried Polpettes.

It was at that moment, as my husband was smiling at me with eyebrows raised in anticipation of my reaction, that I realized I had developed an undeniable aversion to fried food.  I didn’t want to hurt his feelings, so I tried picking at the morsels with my fork, admiring them, and pushing them around in an effort to stall actually putting a bite in my mouth.  Breathing through the sensations that were welling up in my stomach, I had to put my fork down and break the news to him.  Understanding the situation, he quickly took the plate from my view, and I honestly can’t remember what, if anything, I ate instead.  Probably plain toast.  We still chuckle.

This cookbook has accompanied us through so many experiences.  We have turned to its recipes for ideas when celebrating, and to raise our spirits during difficult times.  There have been moments of exuberance, and quiet evenings – sitting by the fire place, dipping fresh baked olive bread into a velvety mix of oil and vinegar.  Unlike most cookbooks that may yield 1,2, maybe 3 favourite recipes, this one has contributed more than 30 recipes to our culinary repertoire.

A Taste of the Mediterranean Olive Bread
This snapshot was taken a while back, one weekend, when my husband was inspired to bake a couple of olive bread loaves. Here they are ready to go in the oven. Too bad my picture doesn’t really capture it’s beauty!
A Taste of The Mediterranean, Olive bread picture.
Sadly, when the bread came out, I never thought to take a picture! So here is a detail from a photo in the book (A Taste of The Mediterranean), to show you what the finished product looks like. Yummy!

You could say that this book has become a kind of reminder to live life fully.  To savour each bite.  And to some small degree, like that Greek Feast, maybe things haven’t always gone exactly as expected, but we’ve always made the best of times.   I guess that’s been our recipe.

And really, that is how this book has become – more than a cookbook – a book about stories of our life together.

A Taste of The Mediterranean, the bookmarks and papers on a well worn book.
A well loved and often used book.

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One Piece At A Time: The Inspirational Story of Chad Pregracke

If you think globally, you become filled with gloom.  But if you take a little piece of this whole picture: ‘my piece, our piece, this is what I can do here, I’m making a difference.  And hey… wow, they’re making a difference over there, and so are they’.  Gradually, the pieces get filled in and the world is a better place… because of you.”  

Jane Goodall (Link to the JGI) 

April has flown by and we are already in the first week of May!  The weather is finally feeling like Spring, and I couldn’t be loving it more.

Let me catch you up a little as to what I’ve been up to.  I’ll skip right to one of the highlights: On the last Friday of the month, April 29, I had the honour of hearing Chad Pregracke present at the Burton Cummings theatre.  You might have heard of him?  He was CNN’s 2013 Hero of The Year.  His story is inspiring.

Lately, with all the terrible news we hear around us, I had been feeling a bit discouraged with regards to the state of our planet. But this month has brought me uplifting lessons that have shifted my perspective and left me feeling revitalized. Listening to his presentation was one of those experiences.

Chad’s story reminded me that we might not be able to solve all of the world’s problems, but each of us can play a part in making a small, positive difference around us.  It adds up.

This is CNN’s report.  It’s quick – just over 2 minutes long:

Chad grew up by the Mississippi River.  As a young man he spent summers diving for mussel shells to pay his way through college.  He described how he could hardly see anything underwater because it was so murky, but he was surrounded by sounds – much like we hear the birds when we are in our backyards, but it was the sound of fishes instead.  He realized the river was full of life, but because most people did not hear or experience this underwater world, they could ignore it… and treat the river like a dumping ground.

“This is a problem that people created, but it’s a problem that people can fix.”

~ Chad Pregracke

As he spent countless hours both around and under the water while growing up, he started to notice more and more garbage.  In the presentation I saw, he showed us pictures that he had taken before all of the clean-ups began.  Those pictures actually made the audience gasp.  They were unbelievable.  Or, as he said, “It’s believable.  The proof is right there.  What it is, is unacceptable.”  At the age of 17, when he saw the filth that was contaminating the Mississippi River, he began to look for support to clean it up.

“Wherever you are, no matter if there’s a stream, a creek, a lake, whatever, that needs to be cleaned up, you can do it.  Just organize it and do it.”

~ Chad Pregracke

The Red River is one of two rivers that runs through Winnipeg, where I live.
The Red River is one of two rivers that runs through my (current) home town of Winnipeg.

For 4 years Chad tried without success to get some financial support.  He persevered, and in 1997 he finally obtained a grant from Alcoa.  It was just enough to get started, so he was doing the work for free (and his work continues as non-profit).  He began cleaning up the river by himself, pulling 45 000 pounds of trash out of it by the end of that first year.  As he said, “People made this mess one piece of garbage at a time, we can clean it up that way, too”.

“People made this mess one piece of garbage at a time, we can clean it up that way, too.”

~ Chad Pregracke

As people saw him out there working, they were inspired to join him.  20 years later, he has worked side by side with 95 000 volunteers to clear the Mississippi River of it’s many mountains (literally) of garbage.  The river landscape looks beautiful once again, and 90% of what is pulled out gets recycled.

Chad and the many volunteers continue their work, and have extended their efforts to include other rivers.  Because of these clean-ups, people have become more aware and more careful about keeping the garbage out of the river in the first place.

The thing that really struck me during the presentation was that Chad is just a down-to-earth, regular human being.  He saw something that was wrong, and decided to make it right.  When he started, he was just one person picking some garbage out of the river, by himself, on a boat.

Chad Pregracke is a powerful reminder that we don’t have to wait.  We can act today.  I loved his take away message:  Look around you, and decide what you care about, and start doing something, no matter how small.  

Every little action counts – every little effort, and every act of kindness.  If each of us takes a small action, it adds up to significant change.

My son had a funny take on it.  He said, “Yeah, you know how people can nickel and dime themselves to death?  Well, I guess the opposite can be true, too, right?  You can nickel and dime yourself to a better world”.  He always makes me laugh with his unexpected, 12 year old wisdom.

As Chad said, “I started when I was 17.  You are never too young to start and to make a difference”.  So true, and I would add that you are never too old either.

“People are always saying that the youth is the future.  Yes, no doubt, but more importantly, they are also the present.  You can do something now, you don’t have to wait for some point in the distant future.”

~ Chad Pregracke

Want to learn more?  Chad Pregracke wrote a book called From The Bottom Up that I would like to read at some point.  Also, you might check out his organization Living Land and Waters.

Today, I am signing off with this sweet medley.  Have you heard it before?  It’s played on the ukulele by the late “Iz” Ka’ano’i Kamakawiwo’Ole, who is among the most beloved and celebrated Hawaiian performers.  I fell in love with this medley from the first time I heard it.  For me, it’s a hopeful song; a gentle celebration and reminder that it’s a wonderful world, indeed.  Treat yourself to a listen.

 Here are some other short videos that you might enjoy watching:

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Where Do Snowmen Go At Night?

Post written by Carina Spring. 

Have you ever built a snowmen?  We haven’t built too many, but my son and I made one in our backyard this winter.  As you can see, our snowman wound up with an unintentional foreign flair.

Since then, we’ve had a few warm spells and then some light snow falls. Let’s just say that it’s best you only see the “before” picture – he is no longer in his prime.

Our neighbourhood seems to be full of snowmen this season.  Some are quite impressive – really big and colourful! Even after the weather challenges these Frosties have faced, a few of them are still smiling!

When my son was little, I used to read him a book called “Where Do Snowmen Go at Night?”  It was written in rhyme, a child’s humorous speculations about why snowmen look so melted and tired by the next morning. It was cute, and  quite hilarious.  I recommend it if you have kids!  Heck, it’s fun for adults, too! 😉

Do you have any favourite children’s books?  (From your childhood, or  your kids)

February’s Fabulous Free Book Feast!

Post written by Carina Spring.

I Love to Read month and Valentines Day have combined serendipitously this year to bring plenty of joy and ideas around here.

In a recent post, I resolved to read more BOOKS at bedtime. Just as I was wondering which books to stack by my bedside, the library at my work announced a free book give away.  I wasn’t overly optimistic as I approached the 5 carts and a table of dusty old books, but was I ever glad that I gave them a chance!  In fact, I have not been able to walk past that library since without taking another free book!

First of all, the highlights!!

Creative Gifts for Valentines Day!

In those piles of books, I found the best Valentines Day present for my husband.  (Never mind that I already gave it to him last Friday, February 6th!)

He loves to cook, and has been patiently collecting a series of cookbooks (“Foods of the World”, from the 1960’s).  I found a whole bunch of cookbooks from that series – many of the titles he didn’t even know existed!  I put two of them in a gift bag and he was thrilled to get them.  He said this present was right up there with the ukelele I bought him several years ago for his birthday.  On Feb 14th, I will surprise him with a few more books from the series!

For my son, I found a big book about tropical fish with a cover picture of a Beta that looks just like his fish. He loved the gift, and was enthusiastically reading it at bedtime.

And for me?  A happy pile of books is now sitting by my bedside, and I’ve been enjoying them all week!

Why The Best Gifts are Free! (Sometimes)

Surprising family or friends with a free book (or some other unique find) is a great way to connect with them. Why?

1) It shows that you thought about that person as you were carrying about your day, wherever you might have been.

2)  It shows that you care enough to notice and remember what interests him or her.

3)  As a parent, I am subtly sharing my values with my son: frugality, a love for knowledge and reading, and environmentalism (reuse).  As a wife, I am supporting my husband in doing the cooking he loves.  😉

4)  It’s fun AND it’s free!  If they don’t like it, just donate it right away!

Hoarding Disclaimer!

The one thing that made me nervous, as I carried armfuls of books into my car, was my aversion to needless clutter.  (Though I love the nice kind of “clutter” that is visually appealing and shares a story and history.)  As I have mentioned in other posts, I am careful about what I bring into my house.  I don’t care about the price.  Free clutter is almost as annoying as the expensive kind.  Here, I will quickly share how I keep these books from becoming an organizational “problem”.

1) First of all, I rarely buy books.  I use the library instead, so that I can return them.  If I LOVE a book, or if it is a very useful reference, then I buy.

2)  I pass books along once I have read them.  From this pile of free books, I will only keep the ones that are special.  The rest, I will donate or give to a friend.

3) I keep sturdy bookcases in the areas of the house where we like to read.  For example, I love to read in bed, so I have a small stack of books that I keep on my night table or in a little stack on the floor beside me.  Inside the closet near my bed, I have a short bookshelf where I keep a bedside collection of books or magazines that I plan to read at some point.  Every now and then, I reconsider what I am keeping and donate what is no longer of interest.

4) I keep books in my studio, too.  I like a bit of meaningful clutter in that space.  It feeds my creativity.

What are you reading these days?  (You may find this hard to believe, based on my posts, but I do enjoy new books, too!)  I’d love to hear some suggesions!

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Take care, and I can’t wait to share my next post with you!

Photo by Apolonia, courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

February: I love to read books (so why resist?) month

There is something I just love about having a stack of books by my bed, so that at any moment I can reach over, grab one that suits my mood, and fill myself up with ideas and stories.

Last summer, my mom started passing along a bunch of old Reader’s Digest condensed book collections. These collections varied in decade, published from the 1960’s to the 1990’s. They are perfect to read before going to sleep or just to relax because they tend to have lighter themes and be relatively shorter in length. It has also been a great way to add variety to my reading because the selection includes books that I may not have otherwise considered.

Lately, I’d been craving a good read, so I turned to these collections, and wound up reading the childhood memoir of Marcel Pagnol, “The Days Were Too Short”. There is something magical about Marcel’s writing.  He leads you along unsuspectingly with this beautiful imagery and then, suddenly, with one sentence,  he evokes a powerful and unexpected reaction. In this way, I found myself gasping in surprise, bursting into laughter, and at one point tears. It is simple, honest, powerful story-telling. Accompanied by charming, whimsical illustrations, the experience is a complete delight. (See image above.)

What a treat.  That is just one of the reasons why I love reading. Yet, sometimes, I find myself resisting the desire to read a book.  It’s a small kind of resistance: like when I am going to bed, and I’m tired so I don’t want to concentrate.  Or the lure of reading on-line instead.

But reading a paper book is a very different experience than reading on the internet. I don’t need to look at all the research to prove it to myself; I just need to observe the way I feel after doing each activity. When I read a book, I am relaxed and soothed in a completely different way than if I’d read an article on my iPhone. The way it engages me is different, too.  Reading a book takes me to a deeper level of concentration, a complete immersion into an enduring experience.

I am not saying one shouldn’t read on-line articles!  Just be aware that each activity provides very different kinds of benefits. Listen to your body after 30 minutes of reading a book vs reading on-line, and you’ll see what I mean.

February is I love to Read Month. As I head into this month, I want to make a point of reading books at bedtime, at least on most nights.

Reading books is one of the most rewarding habits to nourish at home.  It is a simple, inexpensive way to enrich our lives, delight our imaginations, and broaden our understandings. I can’t wait to find the next group of books to stack on my night table!

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To sign off today, I leave you with a memorable quote from The Days Were Too Short. Pagnol’s father always said these were the most beautiful words in the French language:

“Hope is not needed to undertake a task, nor success to carry it through.”

How do you interpret that quote?

 

12 Quotes and Some Reflection for Living Well All Year Round.

Welcome to The New Year!

Image used with permission: http://www.aliciaandneilphotography.com/

2014 is almost over and I can hardly believe that the calendar will read 2015. That sounds like I am living in the future.

Time passes, and current events that were a big part of our life, like the turn of the millenium, suddenly become part of a distant history. Technology moves us along even faster.

The internet has changed the world so quickly; I remember when they brought email into our workplace in the second year of my career (16 years ago). Now, I am sure that most North American children can’t even conceive of a world without their IPods and X-Boxes.  

This all makes me sound very old, but I am not. I am 42. Hey, I still see that as relatively young.

The world today moves so fast, and sometimes it seems to be in such a mess. Yet, it can also be so beautiful, and acts of hope and kindness are everywhere. Life is hard, and demanding, and sad. Life is joyful, wondrous and beautiful. Success, failure. All of it. That struggle is life itself.

A Time for Renewal

So we celebrate New Year as way of wiping the slate clean. It’s a way of saying “let’s all agree to pause now”, to process what has happened in the last year, so we can start again with renewed enthusiasm, courage and optimism.  A new beginning, when all our experiences are hopefully elevated into lessons that arm us with wisdom and strength for the upcoming year.

Time Flies

New Year reminds us that time is passing. Time is finite, and we better get to the business of living well. Let go of worries, of petty gripes, of fears. Enjoy the moment. Celebrate the joys in life, the successes – no matter how small – take them in. Be kind to ourselves and be kind to others, not just humans, but other species, too. Forgive ourselves and forgive others. Think less; don’t overanalyze.  Think more; act mindfully.

We are all just doing our best. Remember that when you want to lose patience with the cashier or the person driving slowly in the fast lane.  You don’t know what they might be going through.

If we keep trying and don’t give up, our efforts will amount to something – to positive change for us and for the planet.

Finding Wisdom

Here are 12 of my favourite quotes from a book called “Wisdom”, by Andrew Zuckerman. The quotes are about life, in general. “Wisdom” is a big, beautiful book filled with interesting ideas and advice, shared by accomplished and famous senior citizens. It’s a book that reminds us that age brings a deeper understanding of life.

Maybe listening to the wisdom of those who have lived a long time is one way to hear, in the words of Bernice Johnson Reagon, “…the part of the universe that continues after we are gone.”

12 Quotes for the New Year: Words of Wisdom.

“Don’t take yourself so seriously” ~Bernice Johnson Reagon

“Life is not perfect; it never will be. You just have to make the very best of it and you have to open your heart to what the world can show you. Sometimes it’s terrifying and sometimes it’s incredibly beautiful. And I’ll take both, thanks.” ~Graham Nash

“Following the seasons is very important, to follow the seasons as they come and to enjoy the food as it is. Small portions, simply prepared” … “Cook with love. Sit down around the table and share food with your children and your family.” ~Jacques Pepin

“I’m curious about life, period.” ~Graham Nash

“…Where people of goodwill get together and transcend their differences for the common good, peaceful and just solutions can be found even for those problems which seem most intractable.” ~Nelson Mandela

“The heart is what matters most. The act of compassion, of being able to put yourself in somebody else’s shoes…” ~ Kris Kristofferson

“People have always said of my whole life… “You are too kind, Bryce.” Well … (being) pleasant and nice- you’re going to be conned, absolutely, for sure – but in the long run, over seventy-five years, it’s a better journey and in the end you win more. In hard fact you actually win more: you win more friends, you win more opportunities, you win more life, you win more joy, you win more character.” ~Bryce Courtenay

“Be here. Be present. Wherever you are, be there.” ~Willie Nelson

“We are in a culture that asks for that quick assessment. I have students sometimes that say, “I like hearing Harriet Tubman better than Sojourner Truth.” And I say, “They’re both dead, and you can have them both. Why are you going to pick one?” ~Bernice Johnson Reagon

“Exercise is very important to my mental well-being.” ~Madeleine Albright

“…just show up and get to work. If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself.” ~Chuck Close

“I don’t want you to compromise, but be careful. It’s your life you are living and nobody else’s. Find out who you are and find out what you really believe in.”… I got this incredible advice, to watch out very carefully and find out where I felt myself attracted and where I felt myself uncomfortable. I think this is what we can call on to approach wisdom: that your experiences of bad things, of good things, of your own mistakes, of your shame… if you have built up knowledge about yourself, you get to have not only dreams, but visions.”       ~Kurt Masur on the advice given to him by his father.

ALL THE BEST IN 2015!!!

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 Comfort ~ Inspiration ~ Ideas

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Learning to Blog: Reflections on My First Month

Learning to Blog

On Christmas Eve, it will be exactly one month since I published my first post on homehurrah.com.  It’s been an exciting month for me.  I have learned a lot about blogging, and the process of preparing my posts has been interesting.

Starting a blog has taken some time and effort, and I still have much to learn! The good news is that there are many sources of support. If you happen to be interested in starting your own blog, one of the reference books that I found most helpful was: “WordPress, Absolute Beginner’s Guide”, by Triss Hussey. When getting started, it also helps to refer to informative blogs and websites on the internet. I looked up a whole bunch. http://startbloggingonline.com/ was just one of the many good resources out there.

As I reflect on this experience so far, I want to say thank you to those of you who are reading the blog, and to those of you who have left comments – you made my day!

Looking Forward

As I head into my second month of blogging, I continue to look forward to posting regularly on a variety of topics related to home.  Over the next few months, I will also be including interviews with people who are finding ways to incorporate their passions into their home life: a visual artist, two photographers, and a published author.

I invite you to let me know if there is a topic you would like me to write about, or the name of a song or artist that connects you with “home”. I will do my best to include your suggestions in future posts!

Above image courtesy of desktopocean.com.

Little Drummer Boy – Walk Off The Earth (Feat. Doggies)

To sign off today, here is a very nice version of the Little Drummer Boy, with a fun video that makes me smile! Enjoy!

Thanks for stopping by homehurrah.com, and I can’t wait to share my next post with you!

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Home, Life, and Living.

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Ways to Declutter, Organize, and Celebrate Your Home! Part 1

“At worst, a house unkept cannot be so distressing as a life unlived.”

–Dame Rose Macaulay

A Great Read!

Today’s quote is from one of my favourite books on the subject of home: “A Perfectly Kept House is the Sign of a Misspent Life”, by Mary Randolph Carter.  It’s a great book filled with wonderful photographs and interesting ideas on “how to live creatively with collections, clutter, work, kids, pets, art, etc… and stop worrying about everything being perfectly in its place”.

Reconsidering Clutter: An Opportunity to Share and Express!

It’s true that an uncluttered space has a certain appeal – it can be calming and efficient. But it’s also important to recognize that purposeful “clutter” can express our personality and our history,  and can create warmth and visual appeal.

When I first found  Carter’s book, it was a great source of inspiration for me. It was a period in my life when, more than ever before, I started to focus on how to set up my home in a way that celebrated our life and nourished our interests.

I liked Carter’s take on clutter:

“Embrace it, make peace with it, take control of it, share it, reorganize it, and when the time seems right, bid it farewell.”

“Clutter is the grand parade that follows us all our days from a playpen of toys… to the places we call home.”

“Find solace and a little beauty in the clutter of the things we cherish in our everyday lives at home and at work.”

A Home Is For Living!

Part of the reason that I connected with this book, I think, is  that I was raised in an unpretentious home where living life was the priority.   What was surprising, though, is that this book about embracing clutter inspired me to  start a process of decluttering. 

It was a big job. I began to go through all of our stuff, starting with our basement, which we basically used for storage.  I got rid of countless things: I donated tonnes of stuff, and threw out or recycled what was not fit for giving.

In the process, I rediscovered mementos that were real treasures; imperfect, and full of personal history and interesting stories.  These items didn’t belong in storage. It was time for them to add some character to my home!

It was during this period of time that my personal philosophy of home “organization” really started to evolve.

ClutterFree With a Twist!

In some ways, my philosophy is somewhat minimalist. I enjoy living in a space that is not overly or needlessly cluttered.   At the same time, I find it joyful to be surrounded by the things that I love – books, pictures, and keepsakes.  My home is lived in, not perfect;  but it’s bright, clean, and welcoming

So my home has become a  combination of an uncluttered calm space, mixed with meaningful, useful and comforting objects that enhance my life.  It is all about about enjoying the things that you love, in a functional space that enables you to do the things that you love!

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Part 2:

How I Transformed My Home Without Spending (almost any) Money!

 

The above image is by Adam, courtesy of freerangestock.com